Elephants Kept As Slaves For Up To 80 Years

Elephants Kept As Slaves For Up To 80 Years

Boonme (80) and Buaban (50) have spent most of their lives in the timber industry and the elephant trade, where they were forced to work to exhaustion while tied to chains. But after a major funding campaign, they were finally released from their owners and released in the Thai elephant nature park in Chiang Mai.

The rescue was made possible with the help of vlogger and YouTube filmmaker Christian Leblanc, 23, from Canada. He helped raise thousands of dollars to pay for his release. The moment elephants kept as slaves for up to 80 years were finally released to roam free in Thailand.Boonme and Buabaan have spent most of their lives working in the logging industry and elephant-trekking trade, where they were forced to work until e.x.h.a.u.stion while being b.o.u.n.d by chains.

With a river and mud bath,  now spend most of their time splashing, playing, and eating fresh fruits and vegetables. t is a far cry from the abusive circumstances that have I
bound them for decades.

Christian said: “Elephants couldn’t be happier now. Both have found a new best friend named BaicHa and as a trio they are inseparable. But before releasing them, they would have carried dozens of people on their backs every day. After a major funding campaign, they have finally been freed from their owners and released in to Thailand’s Elephant Nature Park in Chiang Mai

The rescue was made possible with the help of YouTube vlogger and filmmaker, Christian Leblanc (pictured), 23, from Canada. He helped to raise thousands of dollars to pay for their release

“To the point where Boonme collapsed and had to be lifted by a crane to get him back to work.That’s when we knew something needed to be done.To reach the couple, Christian and his team traveled by truck to a town called Surin for 15 hours.
The elephants were immediately transported back to the elephant nature park in custom-made trucks, which took 23 hours.
The rescue operation is part of Christian’s upcoming documentary “Black Fang”, which seeks to educate travelers about the cruelty behind the “elephant hiking industry” that is currently thriving in Thailand.To reach the pair, Christian and his team travelled by truck for 15 hours to a town called Surin. The elephants were purchased for thousands of dollars before being transported to the Elephant Nature Park in custom made trucks.
Christian said: “As humans, elephants are very sociable and therefore show immense difficulties when treated like in trekking camps and elephant amusement parks. You can literally see them swaying back and forth and they will even allow our cries of sadness and despair. It’s really horrible to see, but I’m glad I did it because it brought me herWe hope that, by showing people the cruelty that elephants face, we can help end the suffering of these elephants and pave the way for responsible elephant tourism.

The capture and taming of elephants began in the Indus Valley more than 4,000 years ago and people have continued to capture, train and work them since that time. Captive Asian elephants are often referred to as domesticated, but this is an erroneous use of the term. Captive elephants are tamed, not domesticated. True domestication requires many, many generations of selective breeding, isolated from wild populations, and results in genetic adaptation to living in the company and service of people.

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